Published papers

Commercialisation of innovations
from the UK National Health Service

Abstract: The potential opportunities offered by developing innovative ideas from staff within the UK National Health Service (NHS) was recognised in 2000 and this paper describes a regional organisation, Medipex, which was set up to undertake technology transfer and commercialisation of innovations from the NHS in Yorkshire. The approach adopted by Medipex has been shown to be a successful model for the commercialisation of IP, obtaining private sector investment and winning external recognition after its first three years trading. Analysis of the outputs demonstrates that though the majority of ideas emerge from service use, the innovations that have high-value commercial potential emerge from research undertaken in the hospitals.

Reference Smith, M.A. and Clark, R. (2010) ‘Commercialisation of innovations from the UK National Health Service’, Int. J. Technology Transfer and Commercialisation, Vol. 9, No. 3, pp.238–254.

The Utilisation of Private Sector Governance Paradigms for the Development and Implementation of Innovations in the Public Sector

Abstract:This paper considers key factors which have an impact on the development and implementation of innovations in the public sector and explores how beneficial elements of private sector governance can be utilised and incorporated into approaches to support innovation in the public sector.  It discusses a number of concepts which could be important for innovation in the public sector; these include overt and covert innovation, primary and secondary innovation and organisational equilibrium. The relationship between risk and trust is considered and the importance of accountability is addressed. The utilisation of special purpose vehicles is discussed, highlighting how private sector governance can be utilised to support innovation in the public sector.  The value of this approach is supported by an example which has been in operation for seven years; the special purpose vehicle operates using private sector governance but is essentially owned by a group of large public sector organisations.

Reference: Smith, MA and Starkey AP (2010)

The Utilisation of Private Sector Governance Paradigms for the Development and Implementation of Innovations in the Public Sector, International Journal of Innovation Science, 2(3), 104-111

Development of an e-commerce website
for innovations emerging from a
public sector healthcare system

Abstract: In the UK National Health Service (NHS), there is a national network of nine regional innovation hubs set up to undertake technology transfer and commercialisation of innovations emerging from the NHS.  However, it was recognised that there was also a need to develop an outlet for products which are not commercially viable, but which are potentially beneficial to the NHS. To meet this need, an e-commerce website was developed to market and sell such products within the NHS. This paper describes the development, implementation and evaluation of this novel approach, and highlights the complexities and problems involved in such a venture, which has been analysed using a conceptual model of business innovation. The analysis of the metrics shows that site traffic, and sales have remained fairly constant, rather than increasing over the first two years. This maybe due to the reticence of other hubs, despite generally positive feedback, to populate the site and the non-commercial nature of the goods may quickly lead to market saturation. 376 A.P. Starkey et al.

Reference: Starkey, A.P., Judd, L., Clark, R. and Smith, M.A. (2011) ‘Development of an e-commerce website for innovations emerging from a public sector healthcare system’, Int. J. Technology Transfer and Commercialisation, Vol. 10, Nos. 3/4, pp.375–391.

Grange A, Rhodes, V, Starkey A How to be a Creative and Innovative Practitioner (Chapter 5, pp 78-96)  In Innovating for Patient Safety in Medicine Eds R Lawton & G Armitage Sage 2012

Invited Case Study for Operations Management, Eds Peter Jones & Peter Robinson, Oxford University Press, March 2012